Structure from Process: How Lexical Influence on Speech Perception Shape Phonotactic Constraints

David Gow


This work explores the relationship between linguistic structure and language processing, a primary theme in Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel's work. Top-down lexical influences on speech perception have long been a controversial topic in psycholinguistics, in large part because standard research paradigms do not support strong inferences about how different types of representations interact in processing. We will review a series of studies that use Granger causality analysis of high spatiotemporal resolution imaging data to reveal the nature of these interactions. Across a series of studies, we have identified a pattern of influence by the supramarginal gyrus, a brain area involved in lexical representation, on the posterior superior temporal gyrus, a region involved in acoustic-phonetic processing, in instances of apparent top-down lexical influence on speech perception. The same pattern is found in cases in which speech perception and word processing are influenced by phonotactic constraints on phonological structure. We hypothesize that phonotactic constraints are a byproduct of top-down influences on speech perception that facilitate the perception of spoken language.


Cite as

Gow, D. (2016) Structure from Process: How Lexical Influence on Speech Perception Shape Phonotactic Constraints. Proc. Speech Prosody 2016, (abstract).

Bibtex
@inproceedings{Gow2016,
author={David Gow},
title={Structure from Process: How Lexical Influence on Speech Perception Shape Phonotactic Constraints},
year=2016,
booktitle={Speech Prosody 2016}
}