Glottalization in LAGS: Exploring a Potential Prosodic Marker in a Historical Speech Corpus

Rachel Olsen


Glottalization in vowel-initial words has been shown to occur frequently at the start of intonational phrase units (IPU) and intermediate phrases (ip), and on pitch-accented words, indicating that glottalization serves as an acoustic correlate of prosodic structure (Dilley, Shattuck-Hufnagel, & Ostendorf 1996; Garrellek 2013; Pierrehumbert 1995). Building on previous work analyzing Boston radio news speech, and California lab speech, this study utilizes the Linguistic Atlas of the Gulf States (LAGS), an extensive sociolinguistic corpus (Pederson et al. 1986), to examine glottalization of vowel-initial words in conversational speech in the southern U.S. The speech examined here was produced in 1972 by 10 informants (5 M; M=63.7 years; ~36 hours of speech transcribed by Renwick & Olsen 2016) in southeast Georgia. Commonly used vowel-initial words (n=200) were annotated for glottalization (+/-), prosodic phrase position (start of IPU, start of ip, mid-phrase), and pitch accent (+/-). In line with previous work, glottalization rates closely mirror prosodic phrase prominence, with the highest rates occurring at the start of IPUs, and the lowest mid-phrase. Furthermore, glottalization at the start of IPUs occurs even on non-pitch-accented words, whereas glottalization of non-pitch-accented words is not frequent elsewhere, thus suggesting that phrase position outranks stress in determining glottalization.


Cite as

Olsen, R. (2016) Glottalization in LAGS: Exploring a Potential Prosodic Marker in a Historical Speech Corpus. Proc. Speech Prosody 2016, (abstract).

Bibtex
@inproceedings{Olsen2016,
author={Rachel Olsen},
title={Glottalization in LAGS: Exploring a Potential Prosodic Marker in a Historical Speech Corpus},
year=2016,
booktitle={Speech Prosody 2016}
}