Does working memory predict individual differences in both implicit and explicit prosodic phrasing?

Jason Bishop


Speakers can differ with respect to how they group the same utterance into prosodic phrases. When prosody is explicit (i.e., overtly spoken), this is readily observed via analysis of the speech output itself; when prosody is implicit (i.e., generated sub-vocally during reading), it can arguably be inferred from differences in how sentences are parsed. Such variation suggests that both explicit and implicit phrasing are influenced by factors outside of the grammar, factors more specific to production and processing mechanisms. The goal of the present study is explore how individual differences in working memory capacity, which may influence both production and processing strategies, predict individual differences in prosodic phrasing. Sixty-five native English speakers participated in two reading tasks, one in which a short passage was read aloud, one in which another short passage was read silently. Explicit boundaries from the spoken passage were identified by ToBI annotators, who labeled both intermediate phrase and intonational phrase boundaries; implicit boundaries from the silently-read passage were identified by the participants themselves in an implicit version of the “Rapid Prosody Transcription” task. Preliminary results from this in-progress study are presented and implications for research on implicit prosody and planning in speech production are discussed.


Cite as

Bishop, J. (2016) Does working memory predict individual differences in both implicit and explicit prosodic phrasing?. Proc. Speech Prosody 2016, (abstract).

Bibtex
@inproceedings{Bishop2016,
author={Jason Bishop},
title={Does working memory predict individual differences in both implicit and explicit prosodic phrasing?},
year=2016,
booktitle={Speech Prosody 2016}
}