Bio signal-based Spoken Communication

Tanja Schultz


Speech is a complex process emitting a wide range of biosignals, including, but not limited to, acoustics. These biosignals – stemming from the articulators, the articulator muscle activities, the neural pathways, and the brain itself – can be used to circumvent limitations of conventional speech processing in particular, and to gain insights into the process of speech production in general. In my talk I will present ongoing research at the Cognitive Systems Lab (CSL), where we explore a variety of speech-related muscle and brain activities based on machine learning methods with the goal of creating biosignal-based speech processing devices for communication applications in everyday situations and for speech rehabilitation, as well as gaining a deeper understanding of spoken communication. Several applications will be described such as Silent Speech Interfaces that rely on articulatory muscle movement captured by electromyography to recognize and synthesize silently produced speech, Brain-to-text interfaces that recognize continuously spoken speech from brain activity captured by electrocorticography to transform it into text, and Brain-to-Speech interfaces that directly synthesize audible speech from brain signals.


Cite as: Schultz, T. (2018) Bio signal-based Spoken Communication. Proc. IberSPEECH 2018.


@inproceedings{Schultz2018,
  author={Tanja Schultz},
  title={{Bio signal-based Spoken Communication}},
  year=2018,
  booktitle={Proc. IberSPEECH 2018}
}