State of Mind: Classification through Self-reported Affect and Word Use in Speech.

Eva-Maria Rathner, Yannik Terhorst, Nicholas Cummins, Björn Schuller, Harald Baumeister


Human state–of-mind (SOM; e.g.: perception, cognition, attention) constantly shifts due to internal and external demands. Mental health is influenced by the habitual use of either adaptive or maladaptive SOM. Therefore, the training of conscious regulation of SOM could be promising in self-help (e- and m-health), blended care and psychotherapy. The presented study indicates that SOM can be influenced by telling personal narratives. Furthermore, SOM and narrative sentiment (positive vs. negative) can be predicted through word use. Such results lay the groundwork for the development of applications that analyse text and speech for: i) the early detection of mental health; ii) the early detection of maladaptive changes in emotion dynamics; (iii) the use of personal narratives to improve emotion regulation skills; iv) the distribution of tailored interventions; and finally, v) evaluation of therapy outcome.


 DOI: 10.21437/Interspeech.2018-2043

Cite as: Rathner, E., Terhorst, Y., Cummins, N., Schuller, B., Baumeister, H. (2018) State of Mind: Classification through Self-reported Affect and Word Use in Speech.. Proc. Interspeech 2018, 267-271, DOI: 10.21437/Interspeech.2018-2043.


@inproceedings{Rathner2018,
  author={Eva-Maria Rathner and Yannik Terhorst and Nicholas Cummins and Björn Schuller and Harald Baumeister},
  title={State of Mind: Classification through Self-reported Affect and Word Use in Speech.},
  year=2018,
  booktitle={Proc. Interspeech 2018},
  pages={267--271},
  doi={10.21437/Interspeech.2018-2043},
  url={http://dx.doi.org/10.21437/Interspeech.2018-2043}
}