Distinctive and overlapping neural correlates of music and speech

Shantala Hegde


´╗┐Music and Language are the ubiquitous phenomena and the two engages a host of cognitive processes. From an evolutionary viewpoint it is still debatable if music functioned as a spandrel to the evolution of music. Language share music-like features such as pitch, frequency-amplitude modulations timbre and rhythm. Neuromusicological research indicates that syntax and semantics (which are considered core features of language) are basic aspects of music. The neural correlates of semantics and syntax in music overlap considerably with those involved in language perception, underscoring close links between music and language at a neural level. Scientific findings involving methods such as EEG/ERP and fMRI, so far indicate presence of neural separability between music and language, occurring with overlapping cognitive mechanisms and brain regions. This intimate cognitive and neural overlap has formed the basic principle for the possibility of music training and music based intervention to target language functions. There is mounting evidence that musical training benefits the neural encoding of speech. Music based interventions are being explored rigorously in neurorehabilitation of language functions.


Cite as: Hegde, S. (2018) Distinctive and overlapping neural correlates of music and speech. Proc. Workshop on Speech, Music and Mind 2018.


@inproceedings{Hegde2018,
  author={Shantala Hegde},
  title={Distinctive and overlapping neural correlates of music and speech},
  year=2018,
  booktitle={Proc. Workshop on Speech, Music and Mind 2018}
}