ISCA Archive SpeechProsody 2022
ISCA Archive SpeechProsody 2022

Speaking loudly reduces flexibility and variability in the prosodic marking of focus types

Simon Roessig, Lena Pagel, Doris Mücke

Modulations of F0 height and movement magnitude are used to mark focus and differentiate between focus types. Similar F0 changes have been described for loud speech. In this production study, we investigate the interplay of speaking style (habitual vs. loud speech) and focus type (broad vs. contrastive focus) by analyzing characteristics of nuclear pitch accents in German. Our study reveals that the prosodic system becomes less flexible in the differentiation of focus types in loud speech. While nuclear accents of falling and rising types occur in habitual speech, there are only rising accents in loud speech. In loud speech, the differentiation between broad and contrastive focus may be maintained by a gradual difference in the magnitude of the pitch accent rise excursions, but this difference is weaker than in habitual speech. Interestingly, the speaking styles are characterized by different variability profiles within and across speakers: In loud speech, the productions across speakers become more similar and speakers tend to be more consistent in their individual patterns. We discuss the findings in the light of physiological explanations and suggest that they may exemplify how communicative demands and production constraints interact in shaping prosodic patterns.


doi: 10.21437/SpeechProsody.2022-102

Cite as: Roessig, S., Pagel, L., Mücke, D. (2022) Speaking loudly reduces flexibility and variability in the prosodic marking of focus types. Proc. Speech Prosody 2022, 500-504, doi: 10.21437/SpeechProsody.2022-102

@inproceedings{roessig22_speechprosody,
  author={Simon Roessig and Lena Pagel and Doris Mücke},
  title={{Speaking loudly reduces flexibility and variability in the prosodic marking of focus types}},
  year=2022,
  booktitle={Proc. Speech Prosody 2022},
  pages={500--504},
  doi={10.21437/SpeechProsody.2022-102}
}