ISCA Archive SWAP 2000
ISCA Archive SWAP 2000

The N200 as an electrophysiological manifestation of early contextual influences on spoken-word recognition

Dannie van den Brink, Colin Brown, Peter) Hagoort

In everyday speech, words are usually processed in the context of other words. In the literature on language comprehension there is evidence to suggest that contextual influences play a role in the on-line recognition of spoken words. Recently, a number of researchers have attempted to investigate the time-course of contextual influences on spoken-word recognition with a technique that involves the use of event-related brain potentials (Connolly & Phillips, 1994; Van Petten, Coulson, Rubin, Plante, & Parks, 1999). This experimental technique yields a high temporal resolution and, in addition, does not require the subject to perform a task other than listening to spoken language. Our study extends the two studies mentioned above, and was aimed at finding electrophysiological correlates of spoken-word processes that are influenced by contextual information. In addition to the often reported N400 component, that reflects lexical-semantic integration processes, we obtained a negative component that preceded the N400. This component, the N200, could be an indicator of a lexical selection process, where word-form information resulting from an initial phonological analysis


Cite as: Brink, D.v.d., Brown, C., Hagoort, P. (2000) The N200 as an electrophysiological manifestation of early contextual influences on spoken-word recognition. Proc. Spoken Word Access Processes (SWAP), 95-98

@inproceedings{brink00_swap,
  author={Dannie van den Brink and Colin Brown and Peter) Hagoort},
  title={{The N200 as an electrophysiological manifestation of early contextual influences on spoken-word recognition}},
  year=2000,
  booktitle={Proc. Spoken Word Access Processes (SWAP)},
  pages={95--98}
}